Education and Outreach Program

A group of 19 people observing a restoration project site while listening to a man speaking.

The Conservancy plays an important role in sharing information to Delta communities, agencies, non-profit organizations, and citizens. We work with multiple educational groups to teach youth in the Delta about native wildlife and stewardship. Our team has visited more than 100 students in their classrooms to teach watershed science, and led field trips to give students a hands-on opportunity to measure water quality and learn about the Delta ecosystem. The Conservancy has also worked with the students of the Franklin High School Plastics Club on a trash monitoring project, to develop an activity guide and other educational materials.

Current Projects

The Delta Mercury Exposure Reduction Program (Delta MERP)

The Delta Mercury Exposure Reduction Program (Delta MERP) is a collaborative effort of multiple entities to reduce mercury exposure from contaminated fish. MERP activities include convening a stakeholder advisory group, implementing outreach and education projects, developing signs in the Delta, and creating multilingual educational materials. Click here to learn more about Delta MERP (web link).

Delta Waterway Cleanups

The Conservancy is a partner in two annual waterway cleanups where volunteers can actively participate by cleaning up trash and preventing it from spreading in waterways. These events bring awareness of good environmental stewardship, best practices in conservation, and water quality. Click here to learn more about the Delta Waterway Cleanups (web link).

Supported Projects

Four young adults working together to dig a hole and place a plan into the ground.

Student and Landowner Education and Watershed Stewardship (SLEWS)

Our team participates in the Center for Land-Based Learning’s Student and Landowner Education and Watershed Stewardship (SLEWS) program.  Students combine in-class lessons with three to five SLEWS Field Days to build their knowledge, skills and personal connection to the land. Each high school class of approximately 30 students is matched with a habitat project where they plant native trees and shrubs, build irrigation systems and participate in ecological field studies. With the help of mentors from universities and professions who have relevant ecological knowledge, students see the effects of their work through multiple visits to their adopted project. These integrated learning experiences combine team-building, science learning, habitat restoration and reflection activities with outdoor exploration.