Proposition 1 Cycle 4 Active Grants

The Cycle 4 projects that are moving forward under the Delta Conservancy’s Proposition 1 Ecosystem Restoration and Water Quality Grant Program are listed below.

1803 – Blacklock Restoration: Phragmites Control Study, $387,440, Department of Water Resources

The Blacklock Restoration: Phragmites Control Study project is proposed to characterize the feasibility, efficacy, and environmental impacts of Phragmites control methods to inform site-wide Phragmites control within the Blacklock property, a multi-benefit ecosystem restoration site in Suisun Marsh. Phragmites is the most widespread non-native species of concern in Suisun Marsh; it dominates the site as a densely formed monoculture, which prohibits native vegetation and reduces habitat diversity to the detriment of native aquatic and avian species. Effective methods for Phragmites control are well established; however, no control method is currently permitted in tidal marshes, as there is concern about negative impacts on sensitive species in the Bay-Delta environment. This project will provide sufficient information on the environmental impacts of Phragmites control actions in tidal wetlands to facilitate the evaluation, permitting, and implementation of Phragmites control across the entire Blacklock site, as well as to inform future management actions on Department of Water Resource Fish Restoration Program properties and other tidal wetlands. This project is located in Solano County in the Suisun Marsh. The project site is publicly owned and is currently considered a failed tidal habitat restoration site due to Phragmites infestation.

1804 – Delta Working Waterways Habitat Restoration Planning, $347,481, Solano Resource Conservation District

The Delta Working Waterways Habitat Restoration Planning project is proposed to complete planning, permitting, and site design to bring at least eight habitat restoration sites to shovel-ready condition in order to mimic or restore the function of floodplains, riparian forest, and wetlands. This project will advance planning for restoration projects that will provide tangible habitat and water quality benefits, create corridors between historic marshland and upland habitat, and contribute to the economic and environmental sustainability of working agricultural lands. This project is located in Solano County, north of Rio Vista and southeast of Dixon. The proposed restoration sites occur along Lindsey Slough, Haas Slough, Ulatis Creek, the Big Ditch, Hastings Cut, Calhoun Cut, and Cache Slough. The project sites includes a mix of public and private ownership and current land uses include recreation and cattle ranching.

1806 – Paradise Cut Conservation and Flood Management Project, Phase 2, $265,254, San Joaquin County Resource Conservation District

The Paradise Cut Conservation and Flood Management Project, Phase 2 is proposed as part of a multiphase project to reduce flood risk to farms and cities while improving habitat for native species by constructing a bypass and restoring floodplain along the lower San Joaquin River. The Conservancy funded the first phase of this project, which is on track to complete all deliverables by the end of June 2019. The applicant proposes with a second phase of the project to identify and design implementation strategies that avoid or mitigate impacts to downstream landowners. This project is located in San Joaquin County, immediately southwest of Paradise Cut and the San Joaquin River between the cities of Lathrop and Tracy. The project site is privately owned and is currently in agricultural production.

1807 – Elk Slough Fish Passage and Flood Improvement, $984,695, Reclamation District 999

The Elk Slough Fish Passage and Flood Improvement project is proposed to prepare a detailed design plan for Elk Slough that the applicant asserts will restore a critical anadromous fish passage, enhance shaded riverine aquatic habitat, substantially improve the slough’s water quality, and implement flood improvements for the legacy Delta community of Clarksburg by installing flood gates at the upper and lower ends of Elk Slough and improving the levees to accommodate increased flow velocities through the slough and to improve their flood protection performance. The applicant claims that these benefits will be achieved by more directly connecting Elk Slough to the Sacramento River, and thus provide an alternative route for federally-threatened winter run and spring-run Chinook salmon migrating through the Delta. This project is located in Yolo County.

1808 – Lower San Joaquin Riparian Corridor, $522,027, American Rivers

The Lower San Joaquin Riparian Corridor project is proposed to develop design plans and permit applications for riparian and floodplain restoration along a 2.5-mile stretch of the San Joaquin River. The project will advance planning for restoration that will provide habitat for migrating juvenile salmon and steelhead in an area devoid of appropriate habitat. This project is located in San Joaquin County on the west bank of the San Joaquin River between Mossdale Bridge and the head of Old River, between the cities of Lathrop and Tracy. The project site is located along the water side of a privately-owned super levee topped with a trail; the land is composed of disturbed earth, rip rap, and concrete rubble with scattered bushes, trees, and weeds.

1809 – Marsh Creek Channel Restoration, $519,494, American Rivers

The Marsh Creek Channel Restoration project is proposed to complete design and permitting for a multi-benefit ecosystem restoration project that will improve riparian and floodplain habitat on 3 acres along 775-linear feet of the Marsh Creek channel. It will create an ecological corridor through the communities of Brentwood and Oakley and restore habitat for native birds, fish, and other native species. This project will advance planning for restoration of riparian vegetation and frequently inundated floodplain to provide habitat for native fish and wildlife, improve water quality, increase resiliency to a changing climate, and enhance the trail user experience along Marsh Creek. This project is located in Contra Costa County. The project site is comprised of a publicly owned flood control channel and a privately owned parcel slated for development.

1813 – Nutria Eradication – Phase Two, $8,483,080, California Department of Fish and Wildlife

The Nutria Eradication Project – Phase Two seeks to eradicate nutria from California. Nutria cause significant negative ecological and economic impacts, including damage to wetlands, riparian habitat, restoration efforts, levees and other infrastructure, agriculture crops, and water supplies. This project is proposed to prevent the spread of nutria further into the Delta, limiting their ability to harm Delta ecosystems, water quality, infrastructure, and agriculture. This project is to be carried out across the state of California in areas of suitable nutria habitat. This project will take place both inside and outside of the legal Delta on both publicly and privately owned land that is currently in a wide range of uses including commercial agriculture, private duck clubs, and public preserves and refuges.

1814 – Oakley Creekside Park Restoration, $436,465, City of Oakley

The Oakley Creekside Park Restoration project is proposed to complete the design and permitting for a multi-benefit ecosystem restoration project that will improve riparian and floodplain habitat on 2.4 acres along Marsh Creek. It will create an ecological corridor through the communities of Brentwood and Oakley and restore habitat for native birds, fish, and other native species. This project will advance planning for restoration of riparian vegetation and frequently inundated floodplain to provide habitat for native fish and wildlife, improve water quality, increase resiliency to a changing climate, and enhance the trail user experience along Marsh Creek. This project is located in Contra Costa County. The project site is comprised of unutilized, privately owned land and a publicly-owned flood control channel.